20140906

RAKE LINK

Rake Link

The overall high-level plan for rake movements is described in a rake link booklet issued for official use only by a Zonal railway, which has details of the planned rake links, composition, marshalling order, permissible loads and accommodation in Mail / Express & Passenger trains handled by the Zone.

The schedule of the train is drawn by the respective Zonal Railway so as to run to the maximum before taken for the regular maintenance. This is published through a booklet by COM and CPTM. The rake link is drawn up keeping in mind asset utilization and maintenance schedules for the stock. The day-to-day operational schedules are then drawn up with this as the basis and used by the operational staff / marshalling yard staff. The rake link is also used by the reservation staff to determine the sizes and distribution of reserved accommodation quotas.

At each station based on the train schedules, a platform and siding occupancy chart is drawn up. This provides, for each day of the week, an indication of which platforms and sidings are occupied by which trains at what times. Introducing a new train at a station (originating or passing through) involves finding an appropriate slot in this chart.

The overall scheduling, traffic planning, and operational aspects of a division are under the control of the Sr. DOM of a division who is ultimately responsible for the performance of the division in terms of punctuality, efficiency etc.

FOIS and COIS help manage the movements, schedules and punctuality of freight and coaching stock respectively in a better way. The FOIS and COIS networks include many ‘ARCs’ (Activity Reporting Centre) such as goods sheds, sidings, transshipment points, interchange points, wagon repair workshops, C&W locomotive sheds, fuel stations, crew change locations, stations, and locomotive workshops. Data from all of these ARCs is incorporated into the system

Rake sharing:

Almost all trains, except special short distance trains, share rakes, for better utilization of the rolling stock, and also to reduce the pressure on stabling sheds which may not have facilities to stable or store many rakes for very long. Two-way rake sharing is very common, where a rake is used for one train and then immediately used for another train going back towards the rake’s point of origin, so that the same rake is later available for first train’s service on another day.

Sometimes rakes are shared between a pair of trains that do not have the same two endpoints. Often the station that is the point of origin or termination of a train owns the rake for that train, but it is not always so. A rake may also work a service outside its owning railway’s jurisdiction.

Trains which are not very frequent (weekly or bi-weekly) will often not share their rakes with any other trains. Trains that cover more than about 2000 km usually have dedicated rakes, because primary maintenance on coaching stock is usually done after every 2500 km.

Rake link has the details of which trains share rakes with which other trains, how and when rakes need to be formed or split up, and many other details as under:
·         Composition
·         Marshalling order
·         Vacuum or air brake
·         Permissible load
·         Train watering
·         Postal accommodation
·         Sanction runs
·         Locomotive allotment
·         Maintenance stations
·         Lie-over periods
·         Distance in Km. earned in a round trip
·         Instructions for sending sick / defective coaches / coaches due for POH to shops

Advantages of Rake Links:

1. More service to the required/needy area.
2. Idling hours of coaches reduced before or after the maintenance schedule.
3. Coaching yard congestion is reduced
4. Utilization of coaches increases.
5. More Passenger throughput thereby more revenue to railways.
6. More availability of platforms, pit lines and maintenance lines.

Factors to be taken into account while chalking out the rake links:

a) Schedule of Train
b) Time and station where primary and secondary maintenance of rakes are undertaken
c) Time for shunting placements and removal of coaches at various checking points
d) Optimum utilization of coaching stock.

Number of rakes required for a link = The turn round of the link in days.

General Instructions:

1. In order to provide the allotted accommodation on various trains, it is imperative that the different types of coaches earmarked to run on set rakes operating on Mail, Express and Passenger trains are invariably kept intact.
2. Should it become absolutely necessary to detach a coach from a set rake due to sick marking or any other valid operational reason, it should be ensured that the same is replaced on the relevant set rake on the next trip.

3. All concerned will ensure that the authorized composition of all trains is constantly watched and deviation should be rectified at the earliest opportunity. Supervisory officials will also concentrate on proper upkeep of coaches by checking up fittings, equipment, etc frequently.

MARSHALLING OF TRAIN

MARSHALLING OF TRAIN 

Marshalling is attaching of vehicles on a train in a predetermined manner to ensure train safety, provide operational expediency and to maximize customers’ convenience.

Marshalling of Mail/ Express/Passenger trains:

The general principles kept in view while marshalling are:

i) Position of upper class coaches, ladies compartment, dining car, in respect of easy accessibility normally the dining cars or the catering compartments, air conditioned and upper class coaches, shall be marshaled in the middle of the train or as near to it as possible and ladies compartment will be near Guard’s SLR.
ii) Non-passenger carrying stock shall preferably be marshaled next to the engine or in the rear of the train, defining the area for stacking, loading and unloading of parcels packages and mails on platforms.

The Marshalling of SLRs and Anti-Telescopic/Steel-Bodied Coaches on Passenger Carrying Trains:

(a) Marshalling of mail and Express trains :

(i) In case of SLRs which have passenger portion on one side, luggage cum brake portion on the other, the SLR should be marshaled in such a way that the luggage and brake portion is trailing outermost or next to engine.
(ii) In case of new design of SLRs with Passenger portion in the middle, these can be positioned in either way.
(iii) In case, anti-telescopic / steel bodied SLR is marshalled with passenger portion next to the engine or rear SLR with the passenger portion towards the end of the train “the passenger portion of SLR should be locked.
(iv) In case of shortage of SLRs, any other suitable coaching vehicle or a VPU may be provided, and in case a coaching vehicle is attached its doors should be locked to ensure that passengers can not occupy it.
(v) Two anti-telescopic or steel-bodied coaches should be marshaled inside the antitelescopic or steel – bodied SLRs at both ends.
 (vi) After providing anti-telescopic or steel – bodied SLRs for Mail/ Express trains. All the available anti-telescopic or steel-bodied SLRs should be used on main line passenger trains and after meeting this requirement, the rest should be used on Branch Line Passenger Trains. Anti-telescopic or steel-bodied SLR should be marshaled in the same way as in the case of Mail/ Express trains.

(b) Marshalling of short service trains:

The Railway Board has permitted marshalling of three coaches in front and rear of the SLR on short trains, provided they have working brakes and subject to two end coaches at either side are anti-telescopic. An Inspection Carriage may be attached as fourth trailer coach on such trains. (Also refer SR 4.23 – 4)

(c) Non- Passenger coaches:

VPs, LRs, WLRRMs and other coaching vehicles, which do not carry passengers may be marshaled as operationally convenient. Inspection carriage whether anti-telescopic / steel bodied or not occupied or being worked empty may be marshaled as operationally convenient.

(d) Reserved Bogies and Saloons Occupied by VIP:

Reserved bogies occupied by passengers and Inspection Carriages/ Saloons occupied by VIPs should be treated as passenger coach and marshaled accordingly. If they are anti- telescopic or steel-bodied, they can be marshaled anywhere as operationally convenient. If they are wooden-bodied, they should be marshalled inside the required number of anti-telescopic/steel-bodied coaches.

(e) Sectional/Through Service Coaches:

1. Sectional / through service coaches, if they are anti-telescopic or steel-bodied, may be marshaled as operationally convenient. However, wherever feasible, they should be marshaled inside the SLR, LR, and VP etc.
2. (ii) Sectional / through service coaches, other than anti-telescopic/steel-bodied, should be treated like other passenger coaches in the train formation and should, therefore, be marshaled inside the required number of anti telescopic/steel bodied coaches.
3. While determining the position of marshalling of sectional thorough service coaches, the fact that these coaches will be attached/detached en route, leaving the train service coaches exposed as outermost, should be borne in mind and therefore, the marshalling order of sectional / through service coaches and train service coaches decided in accordance with the instructions contained in Para (a) to (e) above.

(f) POH/Sick coaches returning to Shops:

(i) In the case of POH/sick coaches, which are returned to shops for major repairs and are attached to passenger trains, such coaches should be properly locked and windows secured, so as to prevent entry of any passenger into these coaches. In that case, it is not necessary to attach these coaches according to safety marshalling instructions and can be attached next to the train engine or rearmost as convenient. If for any reason, it is not possible to lock up these coaches, such coaches should be treated like other passenger coaches in the train formation and should, therefore, be marshaled inside the required number of anti-telescopic/steel bodied coaches.
(ii) It is also desired that the above instruction on safety marshalling of passenger carrying trains should be made known to all the staff and officers concerned and these should be followed strictly.

Block Rake Composition:

For block rake composition and marshalling order, 'Normal composition and marshalling order and rake link of passenger trains' are issued by COMs of respective railways from time to time.

Mixed Trains:

Classifying a passenger carrying train as a mixed train needs authorization by COM. On such a train, coaching and goods stock shall normally, remain in one block (except where a deviation is permitted) and their marshalling will also be laid down by the COM. Normally goods stock should be attached next to engine and coaching stock inside the rear brake van.

Attaching of Four Wheelers on Passenger, and Mixed Trains:

1. Rules on the subject contained in GR 4.08 and in the current Working Time Table should be followed.
2. On MG and NG the single empty or loaded 4 wheeler must not be marshaled between an engine and bogie vehicle/wagon or between two bogies /wagons.
3. However, on BG the above restrictions do not apply to match trucks along with Break Down trains and whenever under special instructions four-wheeled brake-van is attached next to engine provided that such stock is fitted with center buffer couplers.

Attaching of Vehicles outside the Rear Brakevan:

Vehicles outside the rear Brakevan can be attached in accordance with the provision of SRs 4.23-4, 4.23-5 & 4.29-1
1. Attaching of vehicles in rear of Brakevan in fully vacuum train
2. Attaching of power plant bogies
3. Attaching of damaged vehicles

ATTACHMENT OF DEAD LOCOMOTIVES: (Railway Board's letter: 1. No. 99/Safety(A&R)/19/10 dated 10.12.2001 and 2. No.2000/M(L)/466/803 dated 1/9th March 2004)

I. Conditions for attachment of dead locomotive:-

i) Certificate for 'Fit to run is issued by Section, Engineer/Loco Inspector/Power Controller for Passenger/Goods train.
ii) Maximum permissible speed of the train shall not be less than maximum permissible speed of the dead locomotive
iii) Arrangements have been made to ensure that brakes can be applied on dead locomotives in synchronization with working locomotives
i) Running of double/triple headed is permissible on the section over which the dead locomotive is to be hauled.
ii) When a dead electric locomotive has to be moved on a non-electrified section, special check shall be made regarding its infringement to the schedule of maximum moving dimensions. In the case of any infringement, the dead locomotive shall be treated as an ODC.
iii) As a final check, the coupled locos should be run for about 500 meters and the LocoPilot shall check for any abnormal rise in the temperature of the wheels of the dead locomotive and shall also check it at subsequent stops during the journey.
iv) In addition to freight/passenger trains, a dead locomotive can also be attached to Mail/Express trains including Superfast trains but excluding Rajdhani and Shatabdi if the locomotive brakes including proportionate brakes are operational and maximum permissible speed of the locomotive is not less than the booked speed of the train in which it is being attached. Locos with inoperative brakes can be attached subject to the brake power of the train being within the permissible limits. Locomotive with defects in under-gear equipment can be attached only in freight trains.

II. Attaching/hauling of dead locomotives by Mall/Express/Super fast/Passenger trains:

i) Only one dead locomotive (diesel/electric) can be attached.
ii) Brake power of the train should be 100% excluding dead locomotive
iii) As far as possible, brake should work on dead locomotive. However, if it is not possible, then in the case of air-braked train, brake pipe and feed pipe of working locomotive shall be connected to brake pipe and feed pipe of trailing stock and dead locomotive will work as piped vehicle.

In the case of vacuum braked train, vacuum pipe of locomotive shall be connected with vacuum train pipe of trailing stock and the dead locomotive shall be treated as a piped vehicle. If the locomotive is fitted with pure air braked system and vacuum pipe is not provided on locomotive then it should be attached with air braked trains only.

III. Attaching/Hauling of dead locomotives by goods trains:

Movement of maximum three locomotives (2 working + 1 dead) with load is permissible subject to observations of all restrictions on operation of double/triple headed working locomotives in the section provided that brakes in dead locomotives are operational. The above instructions should be strictly followed and it is, therefore, advised that these guidelines be supplemented in the respective Subsidiary Rules also.

IV. Escorting of dead Locomotives:-

Escorting of locomotives (diesel as well as electric) attached to freight and passenger carrying trains is not necessary if the brakes including proportionate are fully operational and the dead locomotive is attached next to the train engine. The dead locomotive will continue to be escorted if attached in the rear of brake van or has defect in under-gear equipment.

Medical Relief Van:

Can be run without brake van (Local SR should be followed for Ghat Section)

Inspection Carriages attached to Light Engine:


Maximum three inspection carriages occupied by the officers can be attached. In case more than 3 Inspection carriages are attached, rules regarding running of goods trains without brake van will apply.

Private Number

Private Number
A Private Number is a number, obtained over the telephone or telegraph from the station master of the station granting Line Clear or requesting points to be set or signals to be pulled off. This number is noted on the paper forms such as the Line Clear Ticket or Conditional Line Clear Certificate and can be verified later at the receiving station (the one granting Line Clear) or requesting the signal or points change. This is an additional safety device.
Private numbers are printed or typed up in advance on booklets which are supposed to remain in the custody of the station master or his immediate staff. In theory, it is not possible for anyone outside the station master's office to predict the next private number that will be issued since they are pseudo-random in nature and do not follow any sequence or pattern. Hence, the verification of the private number provides a good confirmation that the action it refers to was performed correctly and not in an unauthorized manner. Under rare circumstances, two consecutive private numbers may turn out to be the same or nearly so; in this case the second one is cancelled and a new one issued by the station master.
In addition to blocking or clearing trains, private numbers can be used to confirm control messages for rerouting trains, permitting unusual movements such trains on the wrong line, issuing new speed limits directly through the control office, or exchanging any other messages between section controllers and station masters. For instance, notifications of temporary speed restrictions, temporary line blocks orpower blocks, etc. Another case is that of closing the gates for road traffic at non interlocked level crossings (in this last case, private numbers are generally used only when the level crossing is on a block section and not within station limits).

Security buffs will note that while the possession of a valid private number shows that the action performed by someone was authorized, it is not an entirely foolproof system. In particular, the system does not guard against impersonation (the person to whom the private number is revealed may not be who he says he is, or the person providing the private number may not be the one authorized), nor does it provide non-repudiation (the person who is given the private number can disown having obtained it) or spoofing (there is no way for the person who receives a number to verify that the number provided is a legitimate private number before acting upon it). Hence, mechanical or other interlocking systems are still used in conjunction with private numbers.

Abnormal Working in Automatic Section

Abnormal Working in Automatic Section

A. Working of trains during prolonged failure of signals when means of communications are available (S.R.9.12 – 1)

1. In the event of prolonged failure of all signals the ‘Officials concerned of the Signalling Department shall take immediate steps to inform all concerned.
2. Before any train is allowed to enter the affected section, it shall be brought to a stand and the Loco Pilot, Guard, Controller and the Station Master concerned ahead of the affected section shall be informed.
3. The Station Master shall obtain ‘Line Clear’ for the train by one of the following means of communications, viz.
a. Station to station fixed telephones wherever available;
b. Fixed telephone such as Railway auto phones & BSNL / MTNL phones;
c. Control telephone;
d. VHF sets under special instructions, but not as the sole means of communication on sections where passenger trains run.
4. The Station Master on duty at the station in advance shall not give such ‘Line Clear’ unless –
(i) The whole of the last preceding train has arrived,
(ii) The line on which it is intended to receive the incoming train is clear at least 180 meters beyond the Platform Starter or the place at which the trains usually come to a stand, and
(iii) All points have been correctly set and all facing points locked for the admission of the train on the said line.
5. Before handing over the ‘Authority to Proceed’ all the points over which the train will pass, shall be correctly set and facing points locked.
6. Whenever any power operated points have to be operated for diverting trains, these may be released and operated locally under the written instructions of the Station Master on duty by the Signal Maintainer at stations where Signal Maintainers are provided.
7. T/D 912 and T/409 are issued to the Loco Pilot who shall proceed with utmost caution and must not run at a speed exceeding 25 km/h under any circumstances, subject to other speed restrictions in force. He shall continue to look out for any obstruction until he reaches the station ahead.
8. Loco Pilot of all subsequent trains shall also proceed with great caution, subject to other speed restrictions in force and must continue to look out for any possible obstruction.
9. When approaching the next station, the Loco Pilot shall bring his train to a stand outside the first Stop signal and sound one continuous long whistle.
10. The Station Master shall send a man in uniform to pilot the train from this signal, who shall obey hand signals, if any, relayed from the station platform.
11. Clearance of the section by each train shall be intimated to the station in rear under exchange of Private Numbers.
12. Train Signal Register shall be brought into use and all entries regarding train working recorded there in. The Controller shall be kept advised of all train movements taking place in the affected section, if possible.
13. As soon as signals are put right by competent authority, normal working may be resumed, after exchanging messages with Private Numbers by the Station Masters concerned, assuring that the section is clear. Controller’s permission, if possible, should be obtained before resumption of normal working.
14. All the records in connection with train working on this system shall be retained at the station and the Transportation Inspector of the section must scrutinize them and submit his report to the Divisional Railway Manager within seven days of the resumption of normal working.

B. Working of trains during failure of all signals when no means of communication are available (S.R.9.12 – 2)

1. In the event of failure of all signals and when trains cannot be worked by any of the following means, viz.,
a) Station to station fixed telephones wherever available;
b) Fixed telephone such as Railway auto phones & BSNL / MTNL phones;
c) Control telephone;
d) VHF sets under special instructions, but not as the sole means of communication on sections where passenger trains run.

The following procedure shall be adopted for train passing:

2. The movement of trains on the affected section shall be controlled by such stations and on such lines as are prescribed by special instructions.
3. All points over which the trains will pass shall be correctly set and facing points locked.
4. Whenever any power operated points have to be operated for diverting trains,these may be released and operated locally under the written instructions of the Station Master on duty by the Signal Maintainer at stations where Signal Maintainers are available.
5. Before any train is allowed to leave the station the Loco Pilot/Motorman and the Guard of the train shall be advised of the circumstances by the Station Master.
6. The Station Master shall give the Loco Pilot/Motorman of each train T/B 912 which shall consist of three parts:
(a) An Authority to Proceed without line clear;
(b) A Caution Order restricting the speed to 25 km/h over the straight with clear view and to 10 km/h when approaching or passing any portion of line where the view ahead is not clear due to curve, obstruction, rain, fog or any other cause subject to the observance of other speed restriction imposed and speed over facing points being restricted to 15 km/h.

(c) An authority to pass the Automatic signals intervening the two nominated stations at ‘On’, the Semi-Automatic signals and manually operated signals on being signalled past by a Pointsman or any other railway servant in uniform deputed for the purpose and the Gate signals cautiously up to the level crossing where he must ascertain that the gates are locked and the hand signals are displayed by the Gateman before he proceeds further.

7. No train shall be allowed to enter an affected section until there is a clear interval of 15 minutes between the train about to leave and the train which has immediately proceeded, unless a shorter interval has been prescribed under special instructions.
8. Before entering a section where there are tunnels, the Loco Pilot shall light the buffer lamps and the electric head lights. A tunnel shall be entered only after it has been ascertained that it is clear. If there is any doubt on this point, the train shall be piloted by a Assistant Loco Pilot or Guard equipped with hand signal and detonators.
9. The Guard shall keep a sharp lookout in the rear and be prepared to exhibit a danger signal to prevent the approach of a train from the rear and to protect it, if the detention is likely to exceed 5 minutes.
10. When approaching the next station the Loco Pilot shall bring his train to a stand outside the first Stop signal and sound one continuous long whistle.
11. The Station Master after satisfying himself that all points have been correctly set and facing points locked, shall arrange for a man in uniform to pilot the train from the signal.
12. The Loco Pilots of all trains shall make over the Authority to the Station Master of the nominated station at the end of the section.
13. A record of all trains passed during the course of total interruption of communications shall be maintained in the Train Signal Registers.
14. Trains must continue to work on this system until either the signals are put right or any one of the means of communications is restored by the competent authority.
15. As soon as the signals are put right, normal working of trains shall be resumed, but where signals continue to remain inoperative and any of the means of communications is restored, trains will be worked as per SR 9.12 – 1.
16. All the records in connection with train working on this system shall be retained at the station and the Transportation Inspector of the section must scrutinize them and submit his report to the Divisional Railway Manager within seven days of the resumption of normal working.

C. Temporary Single Line working in Automatic Block System: SR 9.12 – 3

In the event of obstruction of one line on the double line section and the communications are available, the following procedure shall be adopted –

1. When it is desired to introduce temporary single line working on double line on electric communication instruments, the Station Master at one end of the affected section shall, on receipt of reliable information in writing that one line is clear, take steps to introduce temporary single line working on that line in consultation with the Section Controller and the Station Master of the station at the other end of the section.
2. If there is reason to suspect that the line over which temporary single line working is to be introduced is also fouled or damaged, temporary single line working shall not be introduced until a responsible engineering ‘Official not below the rank of an Inspector has inspected that section and certified that the road is safe for the passage of trains.
3. The movement of trains on the affected section shall be controlled by such stations and on such lines as are prescribed by special instructions.
4. After ascertaining that one of the lines is clear for the passage of traffic, the Station Master proposing single line working shall issue a message under exchange of Private Numbers, containing the following information, to the Station Master at the other end of the affected section –

(a) Cause of introduction of single line working,
(b) Line on which single line working is proposed.
(c) Source of information that the said line is clear,
(d) Place of obstruction,
(e) Restriction of speed, if any, on the line,
(f) Number and timings of the last train which arrived/left the station nominated by the Divisional Railway Manager under clause 3 above, and
(g) An enquiry about speed restriction in the opposite direction.

5. On receipt of acknowledgment and reply to the enquiry regarding speed restriction in the opposite direction, from the Station Master at the other end confirmed by a Private Number, single line working may be introduced.
6. Line clear shall be obtained on Station to station fixed telephones wherever available or Fixed telephone such as Railway auto phones & BSNL / MTNL phones or Control telephone or VHF sets under special instructions, but not as the sole means of communication on sections where passenger trains run, as the case may be, and trains run on the procedure set out above.
7. Line Clear shall not be given unless the line on which the train is to be received is clear at least 180 meters beyond the first Stop signal pertaining to the correct line or the last Stop signal pertaining to the wrong line whichever is earlier.
8. For each first train running in the wrong direction, line clear shall neither be asked for nor given unless the two Station Masters have assured under exchange of Private Numbers that all the trains running in the right direction have already arrived complete at the station in advance.
9. Except for each first train running in the right direction for which the procedure laid down for the trains running in the wrong direction shall be followed, subsequent trains running in the right direction may be allowed to follow each other on Automatic Signal indications, provided the station in rear has intimated the station in advance of the fact that he is permitting particular train/ trains to follow and has ascertained the latter’s readiness to receive it/them. Private Numbers shall be exchanged for this transaction.
10. Train Signal Register shall be introduced at the stations on affected section. 
11. All the points over which the train will pass shall be correctly set and facing points locked before the movement of any train is authorized over them.
12. Whenever any power operated points have to be operated for diverting trains these may be released and operated locally under the written instructions of the Station Master on duty by the Signal Maintainer at stations where Signal Maintainers are available.
13. Loco Pilots of all trains, except the first train, running in the right direction must be given T/A 912 to pass the last Stop signal which shall be kept at ‘red’. The Loco Pilots of trains running in the wrong direction shall be given T/D 602 and T/A 912 before entering the affected section.
14. The Caution Order part of T/D 602 shall include
(i) The line on which the train or light engine is to run,
(ii) The kilometers between which the obstruction exists,
(iii)Any restriction of speed, and
(iv)the instructions that Automatic signals in the wrong direction should be considered as out of use even though they may be showing ‘Proceed’ or ‘Caution’ aspect.
15. Loco Pilots of trains running in the wrong direction are instructed to pass the intervening non-governing (i.e. relating to the opposite direction) Semi-Automatic and Manually operated signals on being hand signalled past by a Pointsman or any other railway servant in uniform deputed for the purpose and the gate signals cautiously up to the level crossings where he must ascertain that the gates are locked and hand signals are displayed by the Gateman before he proceeds further. He must also ascertain that the points of the outlying sidings are correctly set and locked before passing over them.
16. Loco Pilot of the first train introducing temporary single line working in the wrong direction to stop and inform all Gatemen and Gangman on the way about the introduction of temporary single line working. The road on which the trains shall run is also to be specified.
17. The speed of all trains running in the wrong direction shall not exceed 25 km/h.
18. When approaching the next station Loco Pilot of the train running in the wrong direction shall bring his train to a stand opposite the first Stop signal pertaining to the correct line or the last Stop signal pertaining to the wrong line on which he is running, whichever he comes across first, and sound one continuous long whistle.
19.The Station Master, after satisfying himself that all points have been correctly set and facing points locked, shall arrange for a man in uniform to pilot the train from this signal, who shall obey hand signals, if any, relayed from the station platform. Manual/Semi-Automatic signals, if any, shall, however, be passed on a written authority on the prescribed form to be issued by the Station Master.
20. Resumption of normal working –
(a) On receipt of written certificate from a responsible engineering official that the obstructed track is free for passage of trains, the Station Master shall issue a message to other station or stations, as the case may be, under exchange of Private Numbers and decide, in consultation with Section Controller, the train after the passage of which the normal working has to be introduced.
(b) An entry shall also be made in the Train Signal Registers of all stations concerned showing the time double line working was suspended, time single line working was introduced and the time normal working was resumed.
21. All the records in connection with the temporary single line working shall be retained at the station and the Transportation Inspector of the section must scrutinize them and submit his report to the Divisional Railway Manager within seven days of the resumption of normal working.